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Please note that the Speech Sound Pics (SSP) Approach was launched in Australia almost 10 years ago, and the vast majority of teachers in Australia who talk about 'SSP' are referring to the Speech Sound Pics Approach, rather than 'SSP' as an abbreviation for Systematic Synthetic Phonics as in the UK.  When referring to SSP here teachers are talking about using my 'speech to print' linguistic phonics programme:-) Miss Emma X
What would you like others to know about The Speech Sound Pics (SSP) Approach? Scroll down to the form at bottom of page. THANK YOU! 

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I Can Read Without You (ICRWY) Project

We have asked past and current Speech Sound Pics (SSP) linguistic phonics teachers and speech pathologists to share their experiences and will be adding them here (thank you!) Teachers tend to value what other teachers say about an approach before trialling it themselves - which is as it should be! If you would like to add your own, please message us for the link. support@TheReadingHut.com


Parents who have used this approach at home or who have children who have received SSP Monster Mapping Code Mapping as 'learning support' we also welcome your feedback. There will be others in your situation who would like to hear from you. 

‘How SSP Code Mapping and the Reading Whisperer turned our school’s literacy achievement around’

 

In 2018, we were presented with a significant problem of practice within our school.  Our results in foundational literacy skill development were showing a steady decline.  We were seeing increasing numbers of students failing to reach reading benchmarks and targets for their respective grade levels.  This was also coupled with students showing below average spelling, writing and oral language achievements in the Foundation – Grade 2 years of schooling.  What we knew was this, we had hard-working teachers and capable students, we were just not hitting the mark.

 

​On the back of this data, we knew that we had to make a change in the way that foundational literacy instruction occurred within our school.  We set about reviewing our current practices and searching for an approach that aligned our school’s instructional model.  After much searching, we came across 'Miss Emma' (The Reading Whisperer) and the Speech Sound Pics (SSP) program.  ​

 

I spoke to other schools that had implemented the program and received nothing but positive feedback.

 

As a result of these discussions, all junior staff participated in online training – due to our geographical isolation.  The training was outstanding and provided us with the framework, language and methodology that we were searching for.  Staff returned to classrooms fully committed to the implementation of the Speech Sound Pics program.  This implementation included the prioritisation of SSP within our Annual Implementation Plans, Staff Performance and Development Plans and Professional Learning Plans.

 

​The prioritisation of this initiative gave staff the time to engage in cycles of peer observation.  Staff also collectively planned and assessed students’ literacy skill development using the common language of the Speech Sound Pics. ​

 

Since the introduction of the Speech Sound Pics at ****** Primary School I have witnessed firsthand the impact of this approach to literacy instruction.  A common language around literacy skills is shared amongst staff, students and parents.  The depth of understanding around literacy for staff and students has significantly increased.  However, most importantly students feel empowered, they are in control of their literacy journey.   

 

Students engage daily SSP routines from their first day of school, wiring their brains for early literacy skill acquisition.  Traditional ‘levelled’ books are no longer part of students’ early literacy development.  Instead, the implementation of decodable books has allowed our students to wire their brains for reading quicker than ever before.  Through SSP, students explore the code of the English language on a daily basis, in an engaging student-centred manner.  This includes developing phonemic skills, phonological awareness and orthographic mapping.  No longer do students learn ‘high-frequency words’ by sight, instead the phoneme/grapheme building blocks are deeply explored by students, allowing for a greater understanding of the code of English.

​Early on, we could see that this approach was making teachers feel more confident in the planning, teaching, and assessment of reading, writing and spelling skills. We also saw that students were developing a greater love for literacy – because at last things just made sense!  All of this was fantastic, but we needed the data to prove that what we were doing was having an impact on the development of our students.  Since 2018, the literacy data of students in our junior grades has continued to move from strength to strength.  We are now seeing data trends that are the best that we have had at our school in recent memory.  We now have schools visit our teachers to find our what has been the secret to our success.  It is no secret; it was a shift towards the synthetic phonics approach of Speech Sound Pics. 

 

The success of our school can be broken down in the following areas:

 

·         Ongoing school-wide commitment amongst staff

·         Prioritisation of the initiative by leadership

·         An exceedingly huge amount of work by our students

·         The professional expertise, guidance and feedback from Miss Emma and the SSP team.

 

We have now embedded the practices of SSP across our school and our teachers often articulate that they could now never teach literacy in any other way.  If in your literacy instruction is fragmented, students disengaged and results stagnant; SSP and Miss Emma may just be your answer.  I know it was for us.

Are you a teacher?: Teacher
 

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?:
I started using Speech Sound Pics around 8 years ago because I was dissatisfied with the approach I was using. Although results were better than other classes in my school, I was concerned about the number of students who failed to thrive. I wanted to find a better way.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: I only had the opportunity to attend in person training after I had begun using the approach. I learned through the SSP website that offered training videos and other materials along with supporting research. I also joined SSP Facebook groups and learned a lot from Miss Emma's support and discussions with other SSP teachers. It is a real community!
 

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?

As an experienced teacher and school leader of over 35 years, I have taught classes with students in their first year of school for the past 20 or so years. I initially researched online to find an appropriate program to support my teaching. Back then I chose Jolly Phonics and used it for many years, modifying and adding to the basic program to better serve my students. I kept searching for an approach in line with the Science of Reading that would enable ALL of my students to thrive and to learn to read and spell more quickly. I found Speech Sound Pics online and spent hours reading about and researching the approach and the evidence behind it. I watched online tutorials and example videos. I also joined the Speech Sound Pics (SSP) Facebook group to discuss and share information with others and to gain from the online, virtually 24/7 support offered by Miss Emma, who devised the approach. I became so convinced of the value of the approach, that I sought permission of my principal to trial it in my classroom, beginning halfway through the school year. I didn’t want to wait until the beginning of the following year, as I believed that would disadvantage the current students. My decision was certainly supported by the results achieved by those students! They embraced SSP and were highly engaged. I had never seen students so immersed in literacy learning. They even asked to watch their learning videos in their free time. Their learning continued outside the classroom, at home and in community settings, they were constantly engaging with print in their environment, and returning to the classroom with observations, questions, and ideas. Every year, as part of my reporting, I survey my classes on their favourite aspects of school. Where previously most popular answers included recess, lunch, PE, and similar, now the majority of students in my classes name SSP or some aspect of SSP. I have even been asked if I “rig” the results, but this is not necessary as the students just “love” SSP. The initial focus is on developing high levels of phonemic awareness. This is achieved orally in the form of games and “speaking in speech sounds”, blending and segmenting phonemes, adding deleting and substituting phonemes in words before any graphemes are introduced. Graphemes are introduced in groups, with attention given to gradually and logically teaching concepts of print (such as double letters representing a single phoneme) and making sure that letters represent sounds in words, in isolation we don’t necessarily know what sound they represent as each letter or combination of letters can represent more than one sound/phoneme. The Sound Wall displays the whole code. Every phoneme represented, with the most common graphemes in large, bold print and alternate graphemes for the same phoneme/speech sound in smaller print; but importantly, with all 350+ graphemes shown. The students love to explore the Sound Wall and hold interesting discussions about what they discover. The teaching and learning routines and strategies enable children to move at their own pace through a complete and systematic literacy program incorporating oral language, phonemic awareness, phonics, reading, writing, spelling, dictation, and comprehension. It is a complete approach. The students thrive on the routines used, and the opportunities the program affords for them to learn and practise skills at their own level of skill and readiness, and to progress at their own rate. Spaced repetition is a feature throughout. The resources are such that the teacher is “freed up” to easily support or extend individual students or small groups while the rest of the class are involved in actively learning. Ongoing assessment enables timely intervention if needed. The approach facilitates children moving quickly to the self teaching phase, and mapping phonemes to graphemes allows students to move towards orthographic mapping. Students are highly motivated. The learning progression is known to them and they are keen to progress. They are also highly engaged. Lower achieving students can be supported in every session and benefit by daily practice, spaced repetition, routines, peer support, the ability of the teacher to offer timely support and the training of support staff in the same approach. Routines and resources are available to support these students and Emma is always willing to consult re specific difficulties and remediation. When teaching using Jolly Phonics each year there were students who failed to thrive and with SSP Code Mapping there are fewer of these students and there are supports provided. I have always been regarded as a leader in literacy in the schools I have worked in. My students’ outcomes are always high in relation to other classes. Prior to embracing SSP Code Mapping, average PM Benchmark reading level at the end of the first year of school was always just below Level 6. Our Department for Education expects attainment of Level 5 at the end of Reception. My classes have included 72% non English speaking background and I always begin the year with one or two students who have no English. I include students with disabilities and learning challenges. After the move to SSP Code Mapping, my class average has improved to Level 17+ for the last 7 years. Around a third of students reach Level 25 by the end of the year. I only test to Level 25 as higher level texts are not suitable for 5-6 year olds. Around a third of the students reached the orthographic mapping stage and were able to read and spell the first 450 Oxford List high frequency words by the end of their first year of school. The majority of students easily pass the Phonics Screening check at the end of their first year of school. I now have concerns and look for reasons if any student does not attain Level 15 by the end of their first year. I have supported three schools to make the change to SSP Code Mapping and all have seen school wide improvements.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

At first I partially self funded, and later self funded some things as I wanted to have my own personally. However, I was a valued and trusted teacher, and my advocacy enabled leadership to see the value in the approach. Funding was supplied by my school.

 

Do you have any experience of the UK Phonics Screener?:

 

In South Australia we have used the UK Phonics Screener for the past three years. My classes have not been involved in the mandatory check as they are in their first year of school (4-5 years), but I have completed it with them for interest, and most students easily pass the screener, having covered all common graphemes.
 

Anything else you would like to add? : I am a passionate SSP user and supporter. I advocate it widely to parents, teachers and schools. Student results are outstanding, such that until they actually meet the students, some don't believe them.

Are you a teacher?: Yes

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

I started using SSP in 2016 after reviewing the Literacy programmes at my international school and reading the 3 National level inquiries into Literacy. The programmes at my school were not meeting the individual needs of our learners, especially those children requiring Learning Support, had high training costs (not sustainable with the staff turnover) and were unengaging. Previously the school was using a mixture of MultiLit and resources teachers found on the internet. The subsequent schools I have been at use JP, PM reading and Magic sight words. They also use Read it Again (oral language/rich text based) and C2C.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn?

 

Do you follow any SSP groups?: Yes I self-funded my training in 2018. Prior to that I learnt the same way as the children - by doing it. I follow all of the SSP groups.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

SSP has helped me understand and put in to practice the Science of Reading research. It enabled me to easily differentiate for my students. My students all progress at their own speed. There is no “busy” work which I love. I have been able to integrate the SSP approach across all KLA’s and it fits with he inquiry learning approach 2 of the schools I have worked /do work at follow. I haven’t come across another programme or approach that covers the Big 6 Literacy skills in such an intuitive and logical way. I currently have to use a mix of whole language/balanced literacy and a phonics programme (JP). All have shortcomings and do not adequately align with the Science of Reading, thereby causing inefficiencies in learning. However, due to my SSP training I am able to supplement my teaching with the SSP approach to ensure my students are not instructional casualties. I am a Prep teacher and my students understand and can explain split digraph, the schwa sound and that there are different ways of writing sounds. They would not know any of this if I just followed the mandated programmes at my school. The SSP code levels enables them to develop their fluency and automaticity as they progress (the raps are awesome as they can see their brains growing) - this would also not be covered in the mandated programmes.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

 

I have self-funded over 5 years (and 3 schools). I think I had a class set of resources originally that includes a set of (the old) posters, monster cards, a log in for the app, various teacher share resources, memberships most years, the Monster pack, orange and purple Pocket Rockets, 3 hand puppets, both A4 and A5 set of the clouds, a couple of handbooks. I have most of the available resources except the updated posters with monsters. All of the resources are engaging and support differentiated learning. I am currently limited in what I can use due to mandated programmes but I dream of being able to work in a fully SSP school where it is encouraged and supported!

Do you have any experience of the UK Phonics Screener?: No - only read about it.

Anything else you would like to add? :

 

SSP just makes sense! As a teacher I feel it is ahead of current research. I would love to see it understood and used by more teachers and schools because it helps every child. I am able to include every child in my class without the need for separate intervention or pull out programmes. Children are able to help their peers crack the code. They discover through their inquiry learning. It is not scripted or a programme in a box which I love - it means I can meet the needs of my learners and they are at the centre of their learning.

Are you a teacher?: Yes, Prep Teacher

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

6 years ago. The best thing I could have ever done. I heard about it from another school and parents. I used Letterland and some resources from Letters and sounds.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

Yes, our Primary staff had one / two days of Professional development through an appointed agent. Lots of video training from Miss Emma. Direct contact from Emma on messenger and Facebook.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

Yes, it does align with the Science of Reading.

It’s the best thing I have ever done. I couldn’t believe the results of students reading and writing. Just amazing! Parents couldn’t believe the difference in what siblings could do that were taught the SSP way.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

I started off by self funding, but after the principal saw the results the school funded all classes P -Y6 with the necessary resources. The clouds are fantastic! We have most of the resources available and use it every day. Fantastic for differentiation!

 

Do you have any experience of the UK Phonics Screener?: 

Yes, our Year 1 class smashed it!

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

It is the best program that I have ever used in my 27 years of teaching. And will never use any other program as it works!!!

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

2012. I teach special needs kids and I had a couple in year 6 with dysgraphia and dyslexia and needed to try something different as their past 7 years of schooling had failed them. Using traditional sight words, route learning, Words their Way.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

I attended a group session at a local primary school to see it in action, had the privilege of several personal visits from Miss Emma working with my kids, watched hours of videos and read.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

SSP has had a huge impact on how I teach and forever changed it for the better. It empowers the kids to investigate and learn and I love it’s simplicity for them. The results speak for themselves and I’ve had many upper primary school children going from writing strings of letters to readable sentences within 12 months. Their reading has gone ahead in leaps and bounds too. I love the SSP program as it covers all facets of reading, writing and comprehension.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

Self funded. Still using older resources - posters, sounds, clouds, coded sight words, videos, games

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

Love this program. Our school went a different way yet I still use this as it fills the gaps and increases success in my special Ed students who need so much more than their main stream peers.

Are you a teacher?: Parent

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?:

 

I started using SSP about a month ago. My daughter is 8 in a Scottish school and been failed. Reading age of 5. We have approached her school two years ago to express concerns that she may be dyslexic and asked for an EDP. told they arent done in Scotland. Then I wrote to head of education at council and got stonewalled. We got an OT referral she passed. Got an radiology referral, she passed. Got a sight test, she passed . Got a speech and language referral 18 months ago who identified poor phonological awareness. The school started SFL sessions 2 a week. I hired a private tutor costing over £300 a month. Very very slow progress. I pushed the school myself for an ed psychology ref got it. They declined to test my daughter aged 7 and adopted a wait and see approach. More time wasted. Then lockdown 1. I took loads of videos and identified huge gaps in my daughters learning reading writing spelling all at p1 level when she was in p3. I asked for her to go back a year twice and request declined. I cancelled the private tutor due to cost. I contacted Dyslexia Scotland who told me the school wouldn't take a private assessment findings on board as it wasn't recognized by the education authority and the ed psychologist also confirmed this. Lockdown 2. Daughter still not reading spelling or writing past satpin, writes words backwards poor letter formation and terrible phonological awareness yet had amazing vocabulary I then approached the new head teacher in post and expressed despair school have now done a cognitive ability test as a result of all my videos and evidence from lockdown they have bank of evidence thanks to me after 4 years in this school of my daughter's skills and learning needs.

 

I have used Miss Emma's ssp for a month and seeing huge improvement successes and improved confidence. I found her by chance on a face book group I was in about tim and tobias and sent her a pm ..she told me of her programme and I enrolled straight away. We are emigrating to Australia so couldn't believe my luck in finding miss Emma and the SSP programme

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?:

 

Online videos on facebook page,  Youtube videos,  I Can Read Without You website Monster Mapping app, Monster Sound app
Resources provided by Miss Emma, a Facebook chat group where Miss Emma assesses videos progress and advises us of next task.

 

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?:

SSP has made my parent home teaching fun. Going through two lockdown with very little support from school ,no IT equipment from school was horrendous. I wish I found SSP in lockdown one. The results are so fast and inspiring I can't believe the difference in my daughter. Her writing style her spelling her reading speed and phonological awareness have improved dramatically in just a few weeks. My daughter is happy, she told her teachers how good the program is and they have noted a huge change and improvement in my child.

 

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

Self bought resources from The Reading Hut, apps mentioned above You tube and facebook videos and a chat resource on Facebook with Miss Emma for video assessment and advice on next lesson ideas

 

Anything else you would like to add? :

This program works! I was In despair after a two year battle with the school to assess what was going on with my child. They didn't raise concerns - I did and I have faced huge barriers to help. I've spent huge money on private tutors books other apps all with little to no progress. Then I found SSP and Miss Emma. Her programme is liquid gold..literally magic formula to my childs learning need and style. It's fun informative and promotes independent learning for the child and makes the parent a supporter not a teacher. Jolly Phonics in Scotland failed my child. It doesn't work for kids with poor phonological awareness or dyslexia it made her feel like she failed and was different. When actually the school failed my daughter. Her different was her beautiful all along. Miss Emma is so supportive inspiring and knowledgeable and made me believe I can support my child. It's been one of the hardest experiences of my life getting my daughters needs met. I believe in Miss Emma and SSP has proven result in Australia and lots of video evidence and family testimonies. This programme has changed our life I wish we had found it sooner. I am forever grateful to Miss Emma and I believe wholeheartedly it works I'm seeing successes and smiles from my child every day. Every child should have the opportunity to access education and have their learning needs met. Just because my daughters learning style didn't match jolly phonics we have suffered. I now am ready to walk the ssp road in confidence with miss Emma at our side.

Are you a teacher?: Yes

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

I started using SSP in 2016 or 2017 for literacy support lessons. My school was using Jolly Phonics and I wanted an evidence-based synthetic phonics approach to support the children who were struggling to learn using the school’s embedded phonics approach. I found Miss Emma's Code Mapping programme and was very impressed with how it took the findings of multi-disciplinary studies (the three national literacy studies done in America, Australia and the UK, neuropsychology and educational research) and turned it into a fun and effective approach for teachers.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

Although I trained in the UK, I now live up in the Northern Territory of Australia where in-person training is not easy. Therefore, the Facebook pages that Emma Lewis set up to support teachers like myself were a God send - she is so generous with her time and knowledge. Initially I used it as a place to check I was code mapping words correctly, but as my skills grew I started using it to guide best practice and a continual source of professional development.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

When I first found Miss Emma’s Code Mapping resources, I was at the start of my Science of Reading learning journey. As I learnt more about the research, I was continually impressed with how Emma’s approach ticked every box for what an effective programme should include. In 2019 I was moved from my Learning Support role and into a Transition (Reception in the UK) class in Term 2. The class had already had 2 different teachers and I was asked to show what Emma’s Code Mapping could do. After teaching the class for just 2.5 terms, I decided to see how they would go on the UK’s Phonics Check, a year earlier than they should take it. In that class was one child with suspected FASD and ADHD, one with degenerative hearing loss and ADHD, and a handful with suspected (some now confirmed) dyslexia. I don’t have the figures in front of me to give exact numbers but approximate 85% of my class of 20 students scored above 32/40. I then used the same Phonics Check on the 3 Year 1 classes in the school, who had not been exposed to anything other than Jolly Phonics, and approximately 55% of the children passed. I cannot speak highly enough if the effectiveness of Emma’s Code Mapping programme.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

I have most of the resources, some bought by the school and others self-funded. The daily video lessons and posters are brilliant. Having Emma ‘teaching’ part of the lesson at the student’s level, freed me up to focus on other important aspects of their learning, such as their letter formation, and gave me an opportunity to work 1:1 with those who needed it. It was like having an extra teacher in the room! The code mapped sight words were a real eye-opener for me as I had previously bought into the idea that they needed to be taught as wholes. Again, the supporting videos are a fantastic resource to help the children practise the HFW as often as they require, being shown each time how the letters map to sounds.

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

The SSP piano app is the best app I have found to practise code mapping using the most frequently used graphemes in English. I recommend it to parents so the learners can practise at home.

Are you a teacher?: Yes

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?:

 

2014 then again 2019

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?:

 

Training in 2014 online and dvd One one one from miss Emma program developer and through her online training, ssp groups and web site

 

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?:

 

The impact is incredibly positive with my own knowledge, skills, understanding and practice. I am now confident in my approach to the code, phoneme and graphemes And how children become and gain orthographic knowledge. This approach aligned perfectly with SOR and has allowed me to implement SSP approach and SOR within the class

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

 

I have the spelling clouds, posters, SSP decodable books, handwriting, letter and number formation ssp code level games and activities plus online access to resources, chants , songs , high frequency words

Anything else you would like to add? :

 

SSP has been the approach I have needed to help me be the best I can and help me deliver a worthwhile program that the children actually benignity from. SSP has been better training for me than my actual University degree. The results speak for themselves and the children understand it’s non-threatening, enjoyable and at each child’s code level. This approach makes differentiated teaching easy and directly applicable to each student giving them exactly what they need Such and amazing approach

Are you a teacher?: SLP

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

I started using SSP in 2014 with a target trial for students who were presenting with phonemic awareness difficulties in prep and year 1. I had used a combination of techniques prior to this- elkonin boxes, moving counters to represent sounds and add and delete sounds in words (Lindamood style activities), initial and final sound activities as well as adding phonemic awareness games to Jolly Phonics and Sound Waves that was the program used in class.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

I participated in the SSP ConDUCKtors online course with Emma and attended 1-day face to face training at Thabeban State School. I have kept up to date with changes and updates via SSP groups and ongoing dialogue with Emma when questions have arisen. Emma and the SSP team are so willing to share their expertise and I have felt fully supported as I have embedded these techniques into my practice.

 

What impact has SSP had on your teaching and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

The focus on blending and segmenting words at the phoneme level, the use of ‘duck hands’, lines and numbers to provide a visual representation of sounds, and the speech sound clouds and monsters providing accessible orthographic information have been game-changers for me. Watching students use their duck hands or lines to track the sounds in a word rather than looking at the first sound and guessing has been so encouraging. It aligns with the SoR around best practice in teaching blending and segmenting explicitly at the phonemic level and quickly practicing these skills within decodable texts and writing activities within the student's zone of proximal development.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

The SSP speech sound piano has become a staple in intervention. The SSP spelling cloud key ring and speech sound clouds have helped students and teachers understand the code and not rely on guessing and trying to recall rules that are fundamentally inconsistent. The SSP posters and videos allow spaced repetition at the students individual level of ability and support them to work where they are but strive to move forward. Decodable texts (Reading Rockets. Dandelion, and iPad apps with decodable readers and other PA activities are easily embedded within the SSP approach. The initial start-up was funded by my school but I have continued to supplement this through self-funding due to the gains I see in the students I work with.

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

The SSP approach has seen students with poor phonemic awareness excel due to the structured and engaging activities. I am so grateful for the knowledge and resources I now have access to and my ability to share this knowledge with the teachers I work with.

Are you a teacher?: Yes

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

I started using SSP throughout our school because everything else was failing our children. Our school was using a mix of Jolly Phonics, Words Their Way, Sound Waves and even a mix of approaches.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

I have attended several training days and trained my staff. I follow every SSP page/group there is. All are valuable.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

SSP aligns in every way with what I know about the Science of Reading. The amazing difference has been the engagement of the children which has led to reading and spelling being where I see most improvement for my students EVERY year.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : I have every resource available and use all regularly. Again, engagement is the key with SSP resources. I have self funded a lot because I KNOW the value.

Anything else you would like to add? : When SSP becomes universally used (and it will) we will ALL rejoice in the difference it makes for our students. #sspitjustmakessense

Are you a teacher?: Yes

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

2014

 

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: Y

 

es. I’ve attended many sessions of training and complete conducktors course.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?: 

 

SSP has revolutionised my teaching. My results are so much better that I could never go back to any other program. My students just get it. Their spelling and reading results over the years have improved as has their independence. We also did a trial between two year 1 classes one with and one without SSP. We did observations and collected data. Observation all showed that children in the SSP classroom needed less words written on the board for them. They were more independent writers and seemed more able to just get on with it. Although hard to compare as the SSP class had lower reading averages to begin with, they made more movement as a result of SSP.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

I self fund now I’ve changed schools and roles. I have all resources. My favorites are monster bank, keyring, cloud walls and cloud mat. I love the individual colour coding posters. The Ap is great.

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

I first trialed this program for personal reasons. I have a son who is dyslexic. Nothing his school or I were doing was helping. I felt helpless and I had thought I was a highly experienced teacher. I had been THRASSED, JOLLY PHONICS’ED, reading recovery trained amongst many other things. When I started exploring SSP then trialed it with my year 1 dyslexic boy he quickly showed gains. He went from knowing and recognizing 4 high frequency words to 30 in a term. He began to attempt reading and writing and his self esteem improved tenfold. I cannot see this having happened if I hadn’t taken the leap of faith into SSP.

Are you a teacher?: Support teacher

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?: 

 

2015 school had no program to follow

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?: 

 

Yes and also visited brilliant real life examples where ssp was being implanted had emma visit and model techniques and follow her I can read without you website abd fa ebook posts

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?:

 

 This is the most superior approach to any other structured synthetic program I have taught since 1985 using a variety of programs yet none have the high level phonemic awareness process of duckhanding lining and phonemic cues of cute monsters nor the ability to reinforce code attainment thru repeated instruction as does code mapping by emma Lewis. The black and grey font is a winner patent to allow all children to see phonemic elements in words

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? : 

 

Yes I self fund and have also insisted schools purchase the posters clouds monster cards duck words chants etc children have loved the ssp piano for years

Anything else you would like to add? : 

 

State system has and still is focused on pm benchmarking and has been slow or ignorant of the need to 1st read using decodables. Science of reading groups and many other published schemes are now using many ideas from ssp code mapping yet Miss Emma has been pioneering these techniques since 2009 that I can recall . What has worked against the program is that it is not a 'heres the book off you go and do' type program as children navigate at their own pace they love the monster representation of phonemes which I did not understand at first but now see how engaging they are. I have also implemented Heggarty program yet have found that time wasted on fun phonological activities really doesn't get to the nitty gritty of hearing each phoneme and applying it to reading and writing fast enough. What do we want is children to hear phonemes recognise the code and be able to apply -encode and decode and then we can delve into the deeper comprehension levels

once they are automatically processing the code.

Are you a teacher?:

 

Yes, prep, yr1 and yr 2

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?:

 

Went looking in 2015 for something to help support my students learning and found SSP. Previously was using Thrass. Since implementing in 2015, have continued to build skills of staff, students and parents.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?:

 

Our school hosted a master SSP trainer for a day session attended by our school staff and staff from other schools. My aide and myself attended a weekend session with Emma in Bundaberg. Have been a member of the facebook pages. We now often have teachers from other schools come to visit us to find out more about SSP.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?:

 

SSP has changed everything about the way I teach. Through implementing SSP my skills and knowledge of our language has increased which has then informed and improved my teaching. The SSP routines are differentiated to allow all students to work at their level and progress at their own rate. Many routines allow students to work independently which allows myself self to focus more on the needs of individual students. SSP meets the needs of all students, the high fliers soar with an in-depth knowledge of how our language works, large bank of high frequency words, fluent reading with comprehension and improved spelling skills. Those students who would normally struggle are still able to read decodable texts and learn high frequency words due to the code mapping techniques. Student's phonemic awareness is supported throughout all the routines.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

 

Brain training videos, posters, spelling clouds and keyrings, high frequency duck word videos, monster cards and the SSP piano. Fortunately my school has supported the implementation of SSP and has funded the purchase of resources. These resources are the backbone of all my teaching of English. They make planning and implementation easy and are fun and multisensory for the students.

Anything else you would like to add? : I love the way SSP teaches a code level (group of sounds) but then ensures students are competent at using the sounds in both reading and writing before moving on the the next group of sounds. This ensures that students feel like they are achieving and improving and motivates them to want to get to the next level. SSP leaves no child behind!

Are you a teacher?: I'm a homeschool teacher, not a trained teacher

When did you start using SSP, and why? What did you use before?:

 

I started using SSP in 2016 when I started homeschooling my three children. My youngest child turned out to be dyslexic and had made no progress at school learning to read or write.

Have you attended training? If not, how did you learn? Do you follow any SSP groups?:

 

I haven't attended any formal training but have spent hours and hours and hours watching and reading everything on SSP internet sites and following the SSP groups where the interactions between different teachers using SSP is hugely valuable in terms of continuing education and development of resources and activities.

What impact has SSP had on your teaching, and results? Does it align with what you know about the Science of Reading?:

 

Yes SSP does align with SoR. I was heavily involved in the running of the school my children used to attend, and I saw the lack of results balanced literacy was achieving with many children including my son. Without this amazing approach to teaching I don't think my son would ever have achieved being able to read. I also it have found it hugely useful with my slightly older daughters who read well but spelled poorly.

Which SSP resources do you have? How have they helped you to teach reading and spelling? Do you self-fund? :

 

I self fund purchasing resources. We have a large selection. The coding poster and spelling cloud poster are in constant use and we use a monster bank a lot also. We use a lot of teaching activities obtained from the websites such as the speedy six activities and the spelling routine. The explicit instructions (including video footage examples) on how to use these activities has been invaluable. We have also used the student videos on the website extensively as well.

Do you have any experience of the UK Phonics Screener?: No

Anything else you would like to add? : We whole-heartedly support making this teaching approach available to as many teachers as possible so as many students as possible can reap the benefits. The results change lives!

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Connect with other SSP teachers in the Orthographic Mapping support group!

Facebook.com/groups/OrthographicMapping

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What would you like others to know about SSP?

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